- Mt Lebanon Magazine - https://lebomag.com -

public safety

 

Officer Daniel McBride Jr. will complete his field training this fall. McBride comes to Mt. Lebanon from the Ocean City, Maryland, Police Department. Photo: Jacqueline Radin

NEW ON PATROL Mt. Lebanon police hired officer Daniel McBride Jr., who will be completing his field training during the fall. McBride graduated from McKeesport High School in 2007 and Slippery Rock University in 2011 with a bachelor’s degree in criminal justice and criminology. He worked as a seasonal police officer in Ocean City, Maryland, in 2010 and 2011 and became a full-time officer in 2012.

In Ocean City, he was on the domestic violence unit, the recruiting team and was a field training officer. He was named the 2016 Neighborhood Watch Officer of the Year by eight neighborhood watch coordinators. In 2013, he was named the Knights of Columbus Officer of the Year and the American Legion Officer of the Year.

 

ELECTRIC RIDES  The police department test drove electric bicycles from Adam Solar Rides. The bikes do not power the ride but they assist cyclists so they do not have to put as much effort into pedaling. They are equipped with all needed police equipment, such as lights and sirens, says Mt. Lebanon Police Lt. Duane Fisher.

The bikes would allow officers to power up hills at speeds approaching 20 miles per hour.

The Mt. Lebanon police bike patrol is an important part of the department’s community policing effort and it is especially useful at large public events, such as First Friday and the Uptown Block Party, and on difficult terrain such as woods, the golf course, parks and alleys. Currently, the department has four bikes that cost between $1,200 and $1,500 each. Some of them are up to 15 years old. The electric bikes cost approximately $2,500 each.

To be a member of the bike patrol, Mt. Lebanon officers must be certified and attend classes through the International Police Mountain Bike Association. About a quarter of the department’s 45 officers are certified.

Fisher says the department would eventually like to replace all its manual bikes.